Category Archives: General

Let’s go . . . bikes!

from Streetsblog . . .

 

U.S. PIRG Report: Young Americans Dump Cars for Bikes, BusesPosted: 05 Apr 2012 11:58 AM PDT

The U.S. Public Interest Research Group has been crunching the numbers on travel preferences among young Americans — and the news is not good for auto makers.

Public transit use increased 100 percent among 16-34-year-olds with household incomes above $70,000, according to a new report from PIRG. Photo: U.S. PIRG

The report — Transportation and the New Generation — is chock-full of nuggets like this:

Driving is down: “From 2001 to 2009, the annual number of vehicle miles traveled by young people (16 to 34-year-olds) decreased from 10,300 miles to 7,900 miles per capita—a drop of 23 percent.”

Biking is up: “In 2009, 16- to 34-year-olds as a whole took 24 percent more bike trips than they took in 2001, despite the age group actually shrinking in size by 2 percent.”

Young people even reported consciously driving less to save the environment. “Sixteen percent of 18- to 34-year-olds polled said they strongly agreed with the statement, ‘I want to protect the environment, so I drive less.’ This is compared to approximately nine percent of older generations.”

The trend toward non-automobile transportation options was even more pronounced among higher-income Americans, notable because this group is less likely to be motivated by economic concerns. “From 2001 to 2009, young people (16- to 34-year-olds) who lived in households with annual incomes of over $70,000 increased their use of public transit by 100 percent, biking by 122 percent, and walking by 37 percent.”

A number of factors are thought to be contributing to the trend. Some states now require “graduated” driver’s licensing, making young people pass multiple driving tests and hold learner’s permits longer before they earn full privileges. Higher gas prices, obviously, help put owning a car out of reach for many younger Americans, especially as the age group struggles in a less-favorable job market. Finally, technology, specifically smartphones, and their incompatibility with (safe) driving, help make alternatives that much more inviting.

The pervasiveness of the data suggests a larger cultural shift away from automobile use and sprawling communities among younger generations, the report concludes.

Of course, the American political system has yet to catch up to, or even fully comprehend, this sea change.

“Policy-makers and the public need to be aware that America’s current transportation policy—dominated by road building—is fundamentally out-of-step with the transportation patterns and expressed preferences of growing numbers of Americans,” the authors write. ”Federal and local governments have historically made massive investments in new highway capacity on the assumption that driving will continue to increase at a rapid and steady pace. The changing transportation preferences of young people — and Americans overall — throw those assumptions into doubt.”

Data was obtained from the National Household Travel Survey and surveys by Zipcar and the National Association for Realtors.

Our Newest . . . Bike (?) and a Cross-Country Hero

Bike and Roll NYC has a new partner . . . ElliptiGO.  These “bikes” (for lack of a better word) are elliptical machines on wheels.  Imagine yourself on a bike, but instead of pedals your feet are moving forward and backward on platforms as they do on an elliptical machine.  You’re standing up, so you’re much higher than you are on a bike, your hands are on handle bars with hand brakes, and you have gears so you can really get moving or up a hill.  Unlike an elliptical machine at a gym, you’re not staring at a wall, a screen, a book, or a magazine, you’re out and about.  It’s surprisingly easy!

Our friend, Emily Banks, on an ElliptiGO for the first time — in 4″ heels. It really is easy!

We had the privilege yesterday of meeting Rick Hermelin, an amazing 71-year-old former Marine  who is going to cross the country on an ElliptiGO to benefit the Semper Fi Fund.  Starting from the Marine Corps Recruit Depot in Parris Island, South Carolina on March 23rd, Rick is planning to ride across the southern tier of the US in 100 days and arrive at Camp Pendleton in San Diego.  The Semper Fi Fund gives support to injured Marines and their families during recuperation.  We are still a nation at war with many injured service men and women returning home to the harsh challenge of rehabilitation.  Rick’s journey is an honorable effort put forth by an honorable man.

http://100daysforthecorps.wordpress.com/about/

Rick likes even numbers.  He’s been running for 35 years and has completed 100 marathons, 100 half-marathons, and 100 10K races.  He doesn’t look a day older than 60.  He’s a lifelong athlete who knows how to take care of his body.  He’s one of the most centered people imaginable — caring, easy, gentle.

ElliptiGO is a southern California company trying to get their product better known in the East Coast market.  As part of their efforts, they have asked us to add several ElliptiGOs to our fleet of bikes and make them available for demonstrations and rentals.

So when Rick was asked to appear on Fox & Friends at their New York studio onFriday morning (and by morning, I mean real morning — 6am) to promote his journey for the Semper Fi Fund, we were asked to provide the ElliptiGOs, a couple of people to get the Fox & Friends hosts on and off the bikes, helmets, and general support.

http://video.foxnews.com/v/1496932801001/71-year-old-rides-cross-country-for-wounded-marines

The beautiful weather this winter has meant that our season has started earlier than usual.  Sixty degrees in March isn’t unheard of, but a long stretch of 60-degree days gets everyone thinking about bikes and riding the city’s parks and bike paths.  Translation:  the ElliptiGOs were still in their boxes as we got our other fleet built, tuned, and distributed.  But we jumped to it and got four ElliptiGOs built and ready for Rick’s appearance.

Fox & Friends is incredibly organized.  I got a call at home at 5:30am to be sure that everything was going as planned.  I explained I was only a 10-minute cab ride away and would be there on time (I got there at 5:45).  Rick was already waiting.  Two Bike and Roll assistants were there by 5:50 and the ElliptiGOs were ready to be unloaded from the truck, too.  The plaza next to the studio where we unloaded them was too inviting not to take a test ride.  As the sun came up we were riding and laughing and getting every passersby’s attention.

Rick was called into make-up at about 7:15, then mic’ed up at 7:20.  At 7:25 he was asked to go out to the plaza for a “teaser.”  He was joined by Brian Kilmeade who hopped on an ElliptiGO and rode like a pro.

Brian Kilmeade on his first ride on an ElliptiGO.

Anchors being anchors, no helmet was used, but we always recommend the use of a helmet . . . on a bike, on an ElliptiGO.  It’s just a wise habit to have.

After the teaser came the actual interview.  Rick was fantastic.  He’s a natural on camera.  What was a bit unexpected, though, was that Steve Doocy immediately joined Rick and Brian on an ElliptiGO.  The producer got on one, too.  The newbies were all immediate experts.  And the plenty-big plaza wasn’t big enough — suddenly they were going around to the 6th Avenue side of the building, out on the sidewalk, anywhere they could get some speed going.  I was glad it was still early and pedestrians were few and far between.  There was one near-collision by the corner of the building where there was no visibility, but no crashes.

Rick Hermelin being interviewed by Kilmeade and Doocy for Fox & Friends

Okay, so the coverage of Bike and Roll didn’t happen, but it did make it clear to us that the interest in the ElliptiGO is huge.

We packed up the bikes and helmets and headed off to our next stop — a media event for Rick at our Bike and Roll location at Tavern on the Green.  It was still quite early and no media reps were expected before 10am, so we got to spend some time with Rick in a nearby cafe and hear about his life and his journey to this incredible trek across the country.

Born in Mexico City, Rick moved to the US with his family when he was 7.  He grew up in Texas, then served a four-year stint in the Marine Corps after Korea and before Viet Nam.  He served in Laos.  As an athlete he became interested in physiology, which led to a degree in massage therapy.

“I’ve never felt pain,” he told us.  “It was only after I started to study massage therapy that I understood what other athletes felt.  The ElliptiGO has no pressure points, so it’s great for everyone.  If you can walk, you can ride one.”

Rick Hermelin at Tavern on the Green with the ElliptiGO bikes.

After we set up at Tavern on the Green, several people came over to try out an ElliptiGO.  One gentleman said, “I don’t mean to be disrespectful, but there’s just something really sexy about them.”

Once at Tavern on the Green, media reps from MSNBC and Fox News interviewed Rick.  It was fun to see them courteously stay out of each other’s shots.  When it comes to bikes, there is no politics.

http://maddowblog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/03/10/10626237-sort-of-a-really-long-one-man-parade-for-injured-troops

After the interviews (where Rick was charming and informative — a natural), a man on an ElliptiGo road up.  Richard, also 71, and Rick struck up an immediate friendship and talked for about an hour.  Richard was looking for some advice on hills and Rick had it for him.  As they were chatting, another man on an ElliptiGO road past on the park drive.  I’ve seen an ElliptiGO twice in the past year, so seeing several independently seemed to imply some sort of harmonic ElliptiGO convergence.

The ElliptiGOs got so much attention that we left all four at Bike and Roll at Tavern on the Green.  If you want to try one, take one for a ride, or rent one for the day, come to our Tavern on the Green location, open every day from 9am to 5pm.  The weather is supposed to be in the 60s and even hit 70 next week, perfect for riding any bike:  Comfort, Performance, Race, tandem, or ElliptiGO!

Weird, yet wonderful

I like to walk/bike to work in my shirtsleeves as much as the next person.  But each of the three people I ran into on my way to work this morning (see . . . New York is just a small town) declared that our lovely, 60-degree weather is “weird.”

I made it just four blocks before I needed to stop to take my jacket off.  Granted, I lug a laptop with a large glass screen and all sorts of miscellaneous items in my backpack, but it was too warm for anything other than a shirt.

Each one of these incredible days begs for a bike ride.  On Saturday we rode up to the Little Red Lighthouse under the George Washington Bridge.  We headed out around 11:30am, road over to the bike path, and enjoyed the lack of wind and small number of riders.  The Spandex-clad were out, but the rest of the world one normally finds on the Hudson River bike path seemed to remain unaware of the incredible opportunity for an incredible ride.  The clay tennis courts were filled; the asphalt ones further uptown were also in use.

At the lighthouse we stopped and enjoyed the view of the bridge and the palisades across the Hudson River.  What a cozy place to chat.  It’s hard to remember the millions of people living and working behind you, especially if you don’t turn your head.  The fury of the Hudson’s current moved a massive tree trunk downstream.  I’m always amazed by the power such a wide river can exert.

Heading back downtown we stopped at the Fairway just south of our location on the bike path at 135th St.  We picked up lunch and sat on a bench to picnic by the river and take in the sun and the view.  Seagulls moved in for our crumbs as soon as we were done.

By the time we headed back down the bike path, there was a lot more traffic.  In NYC, the cut-off for uncrowded activity seems to be noon.  Do anything before noon and you’re reasonably sure to find a location reasonably empty; after noon is a different story, though, because that’s when the crowds arrive.  We were home by 3

Sunday was another incredible day and this time we headed into Central Park for a few loops.  The way to do Central Park is to stay north.  Below 72nd St. you’ll find lots of pedicabs and pedestrians.  For cyclists, though, this southern loop is flat and easy to ride.  Kids who would rather avoid hills love it.  But we were happier away from crowds and continued north after the southern loop, up the hill behind the Met, and down the hill by North Meadow.  There are still plenty of leaves on the trees.  In fact, it looks like some of them are starting to bud.  With December right around the corner, where is winter?

But winter will come in some form sooner or later.  In the meantime, enjoy these days of unseasonable warmth.  And, just as a reminder, all four of our end-of-season locations (Central Park: Columbus Circle, Central Park: Tavern on the Green, Pier 84, Battery Park) are open today and will stay open for as long as the weather allows.  If you can hop on two wheels today, enjoy.

The Future of NYC Biking

Cycles of urban renewal

(from The Eye – the magazine of the columbia daily spectator)

Kenneth Jackson recalls his first class bike trips in the 1970s with a certain fondness. “You and I and a dozen other people would go out on bikes and we’d ride around Manhattan. And we’d say, ‘This looks interesting! Let’s go down here!’” These were as much exploratory missions as they were teaching moments.

In recent years, things have changed. His now-famous midnight bike ride is attended by more than 200 students, has been covered by the Wall Street Journal, requires a police permit, and is accompanied by an ambulance. “It’s not spontaneous anymore. … It’s gotten bigger, it’s less fun, it’s more bureaucratic. I have to know which streets are one way, where there’s a bathroom, where people can get a hamburger.” Suddenly, Jackson’s bike ride is one of the hottest Thursday nights of the semester.

In much the same way, biking in New York City has exploded over the past ten years. More than 200,000 people now bike on a daily basis. Furthermore, almost 10,000 people commute by bike from Brooklyn to Manhattan over the Williamsburg, Manhattan, and Brooklyn bridges on any given day. Down at City Hall, Mayor Bloomberg and Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan are watching, and attempting to accommodate the growing two-wheeled masses. And in Morningside Heights, Columbia administrators and students increasingly point to biking as a choice mode of transportation. As Jackson notes, “There’s almost no downside [to] a bike.” And yet, as New York City is seeing, “bicycling requires change.”

Central Park: “A serviceable machine”

By now, I know the six-mile outer loop of Central Park by heart. I mentally prepare myself to climb the Three Sisters, a trio of steep hills in the north part of the park, before even leaving my building. Slow and steady wins the race, I’ve learned. My right hand shifts my gears automatically now. My first inhales after entering the park at 110th and Frederick Douglass are familiar, and I am comforted by the silence, interrupted only by the chatter of tourists and the whine of road bikes speeding past. The initial wafts of horse shit usually hit around 72nd Street. I weave in and out of the pedicabs, with their dinging bells and unpredictable paths. After navigating the tourist chaos that is south Central Park, I am rewarded with the sweeping reservoir views of the East 80s and 90s, before flying down the hills of the Harlem Meers. This was my first bike ride in New York, in spring 2010, and it remains my favorite.

In fact, this is where some of the first bike rides in Manhattan took place. The bicycle exploded across America in the late 19th century, especially in New York. The city’s parks department was integral to its success. By 1885, Brooklyn park officials developed rules for cyclists, primarily applicable in Prospect Park, and noted that “this machine … would be found very serviceable” for traveling “upon the park and parkways.” “Wheelmen” formed clubs across the city and Long Island, and were required to obtain badges to ride in parks.

In 1894, the country’s first bike path was completed on Ocean Parkway. The path’s speed limit was 12 miles per hour, a pace most modern-day Central Park racers would scoff at. Shortly thereafter, additional bike paths along the waterfronts of Brooklyn, Manhattan, and the Bronx were constructed. In 1936, under Parks Commissioner Robert Moses, the west drive of Central Park was finally opened to cyclists in order to establish a space for them outside of streets and park paths, which were deemed “dangerous.” Moses was integral in championing additional bike paths in parks across the city.

Interest in cycling as a recreational activity and competitive sport ebbed and flowed, then picked up speed again in the 1960 as the city began to close avenues and park drives to cars at certain hours to accommodate cyclists. Street bike lanes emerged in 1978 in Manhattan, connecting Central Park South to downtown. In the 1990s, the city government decided to recuperate the once-industrial western shore of Manhattan and develop a bike greenway.

Today the Hudson River Greenway stretches from Dyckman Street in Inwood to Battery Park, and is the most heavily used bikeway in the United States.
For most of the bicycle’s history, it has served as a purely recreational tool for New Yorkers. It’s only with the development of bike lanes and greenways, especially on inter-borough bridges, that cycling has become a practical means of transportation.

Williamsburg Bridge: “There’s strength in numbers”

Nearly every weekday, Laralyn Mowers commutes from Crown Heights to Manhattan over the Williamsburg and Manhattan bridges. Mowers, who began commuting by bike in April, received her masters in human rights from Columbia’s Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in the spring, and is a former employee of ModSquad Cycles at 114th and Frederick Douglass. “I can get anywhere in New York on my bike faster than on the subway. I have control over my life when I take my bike,” she explains. Even though she suffered three accidents this summer, she still believes commuting by bike is the best option in New York City.

Mowers is joined by more than 17,000 New Yorkers who cycle to work on an average weekday, many of whom come from Brooklyn to Manhattan via the bridges. Commuter cycling in New York City grew by 13 percent between 2009 and 2010. More than four times as many people commuted by bike in 2010 than in 1986. Every Manhattan avenue except 11th and 12th avenues now carries more than 1,000 cyclists a day.

Why are so many people commuting by bike? George Beane, Upper West Side resident, bike commuter and member of the Columbus Avenue Business Improvement District, says it’s simple: bikes are the “fastest, cheapest, and most fun way to get around.” In many cases it’s easier to get around New York on bike, especially within Brooklyn, and between the east and west sides of Manhattan. New York’s population is rapidly growing in places like Hell’s Kitchen, Greenpoint, and Bushwick, where subway service is inconvenient and bus service is painfully slow.

Biking, by comparison, is fast. Each year, Transportation Alternatives, a bike activism organization, sponsors a morning commute race in which three people travel from their homes in Fort Greene to their offices in Union Square. A cyclist, a taxi passenger, and a subway passenger speed to work, coping with traffic and train delays along the way. For the past eight years, the cyclist has won.

The Department of Transportation, under Bloomberg and Sadik-Khan, is encouraging New Yorkers to bike to work, primarily by constructing new bike lanes, increasing bike parking inside and outside of office buildings, and developing a new city-wide bike share, which will launch next year. As Brent Tongco of Bike New York, a bicycle education and advocacy group, notes, “The DOT has done a tremendous job in building bicycle connectivity. Ten years ago I wouldn’t be able to find a bike lane for the life of me. Now they’re almost everywhere.”

Both Beane and Tongco add that rising concerns about health, efficiency, and cost motivate people to bike, too. For the price of a monthly MetroCard, you can buy a decent used bike to commute. Though Beane has been biking in the city for 45 years, he has noticed that the recent surge in cyclists is among “all ages and all incomes.” Tongco cites rising environmental awareness as motivation for many people to bike, even though New Yorkers’ carbon footprints are below the national average.

Ultimately, however, the commuter biking movement is building on itself. Beane notes that “people are following the lead of other cyclists. What works for some gets picked up by others.” Seeing other people biking safely, and talking about how much they enjoy it, empowers new cyclists. This cyclical effect makes biking safer for everyone—and safety is paramount. “There’s the strength in numbers idea. You won’t have more bicyclists without infrastructure improvements, and you won’t have those without more bicyclists. Janette Sadik-Khan is a visionary and she knows this is cyclical, and she wants to take the lead … so that the people come out of the woodwork and start biking,” Tongco says.

There are plenty of cyclists who have climbed out of the woodwork and are riding on the Williamsburg Bridge when I journey across it on a recent Sunday afternoon. I enter the bridge from the Manhattan side, exiting the trafficked chaos of Delancey Street. The climb up is always steeper than I remember. At first I’m speeding past the pedestrians in our semi-shared lane, then they’re passing me and I’ve lost my breath. Cyclists coming from the Brooklyn side fly by me on their sleek road bikes and European-style cruisers. As I leave Manhattan behind, the sound of traffic below me on the bridge dissipates, and the J train rumbles by. When I look up, I am surrounded by sweeping views of Brooklyn, lower Manhattan, and the East River. This, I remember, is why I started biking in New York—to feel connected to the city itself, to experience it as I move through it. Within minutes I reach the top and descend into the industrial, bike-laned quiet of south Williamsburg.

The DOT’s all-stops-out effort to increase biking in New York is not to be underestimated. As part of PlaNYC, the city’s sustainability initiative, the DOT constructed 200 bike-lane miles between 2006 and 2009. In the same period, it installed 3100 on-street bike racks. Commuter cycling grew 45 percent. By 2030, the city will have 1800 bike-lane miles. The DOT has also led innovation in cycling infrastructure. Not all bike lanes are created alike. Some are separate white lanes painted on the road, others are protected bike paths that utilize a lane of parked cars to separate vehicle and bike traffic. Many bike lanes are painted green to increase motorist and pedestrian awareness.

Bike parking, a seemingly small issue, has been another force for innovation within DOT bike policy. Under the Bicycle Access to Office Buildings law, passed in 2009, office building owners are required to accommodate cyclists who bike to work, if they so request. The DOT has grown the network of outdoor bike racks and developed a sheltered bike parking structure.

A lack of residential bike storage prohibits many people from buying and commuting by bike. For this and other reasons, the DOT has partnered with Alta Bicycle Share, a private company, to develop a city-wide bike share, which will launch next summer. For an annual fee of less than $100, city residents will have access to 10,000 bikes at 600 stations across Manhattan and Brooklyn, and potentially other boroughs. Modeled after similar programs found across the U.S. and Europe, the NYC Bike Share will allow people who either don’t have the physical space or desire to own a bike to move throughout the city on two wheels. It will also allow locals and tourists to rent sporadically, for recreational purposes. Once again, the DOT and Commissioner Sadik-Khan are driving the increase in cycling.

Columbus Avenue: Towards “complete streets”

Yet the uptick in ridership has not been met with city-wide acclaim.

“What are cyclists?” asks Jackson. “Are they vehicles like a car, or people like a person? They can’t fight with cars, but it’s not fair for them to fight with people either.” This dichotomy is at the heart of many New Yorkers’ discontent with the growth of bicycling. Deliverymen on tricked-out bikes frequently ride on sidewalks or on the wrong side of the street. Nearly every cyclist runs red lights (myself included). “Lots of people see bicyclists as menaces, and Janette Sadik-Khan as a Nazi,” Jackson says. It often seems that cyclists want all the rights of the road and none of the responsibilities. Drivers complain that cyclists riding in traffic are unpredictable and don’t signal. Pedestrians, accustomed to looking out for cars but not bikes, are caught off-guard.

Bike lanes and street redesigns have attempted to create a third space for cyclists, in line with their seemingly separate status. The Columbus Avenue redesign, between 96th and 77th streets, is a prime example. The bike lane lies on the east side of the street and is separated from traffic by a lane of parked cars. Like most street redesigns in New York City, the Columbus one was decided between the local community board, the DOT, and residents. In 2009, Community Board 7 requested that the DOT develop a plan to implement a protected bike lane on the Upper West Side. Mel Wymore, outgoing chair of CB7, says: “There was a lot of common support for a bike lane on the Upper West Side, especially on Columbus.” The lane was seen as the first step in “creating a network of viable lanes” in the neighborhood. In April 2010, the DOT responded with a complete street redesign plan for Columbus between 96th and 77th streets. From here, CB7 approved the plan with community support.

Construction was slated to start on the redesign in August 2010, when the community board was on a summer hiatus. The DOT, without CB7’s consent, changed several design elements before implementation, in what Wymore sees as a mix of an increase in available funds from the city and a “broader vision” for the avenue. The new plan more than quadrupled the number of pedestrian islands and reduced parking even more. “It would have been nice to have been involved,” Wymore states. “We didn’t have an opportunity to inform the community.” As a result, many people who supported the new bike lane as a temporary measure were “disconcerted by the permanence” of the new plan.

“There’s a difference between thinking about a bike lane and the actual implementation of it,” Wymore asserts. “The physicality [of the Columbus redesign] was different than what people thought.” As a result, he created a working group last fall comprised of various stakeholders, such as avenue businesses, concerned residents, local government officials, and cycling advocates. The group went block by block to assess problems with the redesign. The most outspoken critics were (and still are) residents in need of parking and business owners who rely on loading and unloading, both of which were significantly reduced by the redesign. 81st Street was also heavily hit by the changes and produced angry residents and business owners, some of whom have now come to firmly support the bike lane. There were concerns about the new pedestrian islands, which can be confusing for pedestrians themselves. “The bike lane was blamed for a lack of parking, and loading/unloading spaces, but it wasn’t the bike lane’s fault,” Wymore says.

The group produced a report with specific adjustments for the bike lane, such as signage and turning lane changes. Wymore credits the group’s success on the fact that “we were able to be data-driven and specific” in addressing the issues instead of relying on opinions and feelings. “I think the DOT is dedicated,” he notes. “People sometimes feel like the DOT does not have a robust public process before it moves forward, but its job is enormous.”

My ride down the Columbus lane is short and bumpy. As I enter on 96th Street, I immediately hit a series of storm drains and sewer covers that last the entire lane. It’s nice not having to worry about cabs cutting me off, but I nearly hit three pedestrians, who seem to think that the bike lane is actually made for casual strolls, chatting, or waiting to cross the street. At 81st Street, I run into the Sunday farmers market. While the street redesign stipulates specific hours for normal merchant deliveries, there’s a constant flow of movement between farmstands and trucks on Sundays, and I’m right in the middle of it. I do my best to dodge farmers carrying crates of produce until I finally arrive at 77th Street and rejoin traffic. Thanks, DOT and CB7, for building me a bike lane. I appreciate the sentiment. But next time, I might just ride with traffic instead.

I am reminded by Tila Duhaime of Upper West Side Streets Renaissance that the Columbus redesign is not just about me as a cyclist. Rather, it’s about making the street “more democratic” for all. The increased bike traffic on Columbus since the redesign is “speaking to a large unmet need” among cyclists for safe streets. Yet the new Columbus is also designed to “improve the streetscape generally” especially for pedestrians. The goal is to make the street safer for everyone. The DOT’s data from the first six months of the new Columbus show that the redesign has done just that. Total crashes are down 34 percent, and vehicular speeding has also dropped. Sidewalk bike ridership has dropped from a pre-redesign high of 9.3 percent to a current maximum of 2.8 percent. City Councilwoman Gale Brewer’s office, in a separate survey, found that 70 percent of locals surveyed believe the street redesign is “moving in the right direction.”

Beane also points to cyclists as just one element of establishing “complete streets.” He believes that the new Columbus is closer to achieving this goal than the old. Because the bike lanes went in with other, more controversial changes, such as decreased street parking, all of the subsequent complaints were associated with the bike lanes. He attributes this to “growing pains” and nothing more. “Merchants have gotten accustomed and deliveries are working out well now.” Like Duhaime, Beane points to the community task force established by Wymore as the driving force in resolving the problems that arose with the redesign.

Wymore believes that the Columbus redesign should be the first of many DOT initiatives to “engage the whole city around the idea of complete streets.” The Columbus changes have been a challenge and a shift for the community. “It’s difficult when you’re talking about change of behavior,” he notes. The issue is not just that bike lanes, street redesigns and the changing urban landscape require personal, everyday changes, but that “people keep being taken by surprise” when these changes arrive on their block.

Morningside: “A much bigger idea of what New York is”

By now, I know Broadway between 110th and 116th streets on two wheels just as well as I do on two feet. I’ve ridden these six blocks in the freezing cold and in mid-August sweat, coming back from a day trip to Brooklyn and from countless loops in Central Park, in the setting sun and at two in the morning.
I pass Westside and Deluxe on the uptown side and know that I am slowly, block-by-block, making my way home. I dodge delivery trucks and wave to friends before pulling over at the gates. On my way downtown, everything is a blur until the chaos of the 110th intersection. Only there do I begin to feel the anonymity and freedom of leaving Morningside Heights.

Stephanie Jurburg, a Columbia College senior, explains why biking is especially viable for college students: “It’s cheaper than the subway, for one,” she notes. And furthermore, “You get to see way more. … You know where you are.” Cycling “gives you a much bigger idea of what New York is.” Grasping that “bigger idea” is why many of us chose to attend Columbia in the first place.

It’s for these reasons that Elizabeth Kipp-Giusti and the Columbia EcoReps are developing a campus-wide bike share program, to hopefully launch in 2012. The project was born out of Columbia Public Safety’s mysterious “bike closet,” a collection of abandoned bikes on Columbia’s campus that public safety officers clipped. The issue was simple: the bikes were taking up valuable space in Low Library. A working group, which Kipp-Giusti was a part of, started examining the feasibility of turning the collection into a bike share last year. In the same way that the City’s bike share is not targeting the most avid cyclists, who already have their own bikes, the Columbia share would serve people who are interested in cycling but not yet committed bikers. “A bike share is a program for a people who happen to have a couple of hours and want to go for a bike ride,” she explains. She envisions students using the bikes to pick up groceries at the 72nd Street Trader Joe’s or taking a day trip to the Brooklyn Bridge. The program does not seek to revolutionize the way students get around the Morningside campus but rather “provide a choice to students who want to get out into the city more, which is one of the main purposes of being at a school like Columbia.”

Yet the University also must consider liability, rider education, and the actual mechanism of checking bikes in and out. Most pressing among the unresolved issues is who will have access to the share. Would the program be limited to students, or would faculty and staff be included as well? Currently the bike share committee within the EcoReps is working to garner student council support, and writing a strategic plan to bring before the administration. The challenge is developing the program so that it can last long after students on the committee graduate.

Beyond the bike closet, Public Safety has been the origin of the majority of the University’s bike-related initiatives. Ricardo “Ricky” Morales, crime prevention director, lists the host of efforts his office has made to support cyclists: installing more than 200 bike racks across the University’s campuses, creating a program to register bikes with the NYPD in case of theft, selling expensive but effective U-locks at cost, and distributing bike maps and information. Morales mentions, with special pride, his twice-annual “Ride your bike to campus” events, which offer University students and staff free bike tune-ups and the opportunity to register their bikes with the NYPD. At the August event, 61 bikes were registered and students came from as far as Brooklyn to participate. Because of Public Safety’s efforts to “constantly promote how to secure your bike,” bike theft has decreased in recent years, and Morales believes theft rates are “evening out.” In terms of additional initiatives, Morales asserts that “what we have done is good enough.” He believes that the University’s efforts are to increase cycling are “perfect.”

The Office of Environmental Stewardship and the Work/Life Office are also working to promote biking among faculty and staff, and to some degree, students. According to Nilda Mesa, associate vice president of environmental stewardship, her office tries to advertise Public Safety’s bike-related initiatives. Environmental Stewardship hasn’t conducted a formal survey on cycling in the University community, but Mesa has noticed “that the level of interest amongst both faculty/staff and students has increased” in recent years. She points to the growth of the city’s bike infrastructure under Bloomberg and Sadik-Khan as the cause. The number of bike parking options has increased across campus, and, apart from providing information and developing the bike share, Mesa seems to think that this is the best way to promote biking in the community. She notes that, while “we can always do more, New York City has come a long way over the last few years, and so have we.”

Yet there is a general consensus among students and faculty that the university does indeed need to do more. Several students involved in realizing the EcoReps bike share explain that the initiative is now primarily student-driven, even though it originated within the administration. “You could make the argument that this is not one of the most pressing issues” the University is facing, so “it gets put on the back burner,” Kipp-Giusti says. “I don’t think there is a lack of interest from an administrative standpoint, but I do think that other things have been prioritized.”

Meanwhile, Christia Mercer, associate professor of philosophy in Columbia College, believes the University needs to step up its efforts to make biking to campus a feasible option for faculty and staff. “It makes me happy to bike” from her home on 105th Street and Central Park West, “but in the past year it has become more of a chore” with the lack of bike parking on lower campus, she explains. Now that commuter cycling has become more popular, bike parking is even more difficult to come by, and Mercer doesn’t see carrying her bike up Low Steps to her office in Philosophy Hall as a viable option.

After her bike was stolen from a bike rack in front of the guardhouse at 116th and Amsterdam, Mercer reported the incident to Public Safety, who never followed up on her report. “This happens all the time,” Public Safety told her. “They never catch anyone.” This, along with the lack of parking, leads Mercer to believe that “Columbia hasn’t gotten the fact that the bike culture has changed,” even though University administrators argue otherwise. “They don’t make it easy for those of us who have bikes.”

Ultimately, increasing infrastructure for cyclists, whether at Columbia or in New York City as a whole, must originate with increased communication between cyclists and the people who design the systems they use. It has been thanks to outspoken cyclists such as Mercer and Kipp-Giusti that the University is being to act.

New York City: “A time of tremendous adjustment”

With so much progress made in the past ten years, is New York City on track to be the next Amsterdam? Certainly, every cyclist I spoke to for this story couldn’t help but dream.

Over the next five years, “cycling will become taken for granted as another form of transportation,” Beane asserts. He notes that, while “we are going through a time of tremendous adjustment,” cycling will become more integrated into daily life, and pedestrians and drivers will adjust. He envisions interconnected bike lanes throughout New York City, specifically the extension of the Columbus lane uptown, and connections in midtown.

Before traveling and biking through Europe, “I didn’t know that post-modern countries had adopted the bike,” Jurburg says. “New York is falling behind.” And yet she confirms that cycling is taking on here, and will continue to. With reason, she points to the fact that police are cracking down on cyclists as a sign that cycling is being integrated into the cityscape. “You don’t regulate something that’s insignificant.” Mowers, however, argues that the police “need to back off of cyclists.” Instead of “punishing the bikers” as cycling becomes more prevalent, she hopes to see “a legitimate plan for biking to become a real transportation alternative.”

“We want as many people to bike as possible, from all walks of life,” Tongco says. “We want to stress the importance of safety for complete living streets.”
For now, I hop on my bike outside my building on 114th Street and fly down Broadway with traffic. On two wheels, New York is mine.

On Two Wheels with Water as a Companion

 

(by Jane Margolies, New York Times)

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WHEN I told my local bicycle mechanic that I was thinking about circling the city by following the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway, he shrugged off my reservations about the unfinished route, which I’d heard was still dicey in parts.

“It’s Manhattan,” he said. “It’s an island. What are you going to do, get lost?”
Yet there I was on a recent Sunday morning, turning right at East 63rd Street, only to find that I’d started down the car ramp onto the Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive.
Though the Greenway does encompass some city streets, mostly it snakes for more than 28 miles along rivers, under bridges and through parks. My companion for the ride was the recently released 2011 NYC Cycling Map (available atbike shops or by calling the city’s 311 information line), depicting the Greenway mostly as an enticing thick green line along much of the coast, with dotted lines indicating sections to come. (Full disclosure: I recently worked as a freelance editor on the city’s new plan for waterfront development; the Greenway was mapped out years earlier.)
Cycling the route is on the whole satisfying and at times exhilarating — a boon for bikers like me who get bored going round and round Central Park. But that doesn’t mean that there aren’t bumps in the road.

WEST SIDE From the West 103rd Street entrance to Riverside Park, it was a quick trip down a hill and under an overpass to reach the Hudson River. There, signs for the NYC Greenway — racetrack-shaped and green, with a five-leafed ivy motif — greeted me.

The Department of City Planning included a route around Manhattan in its 1993 master plan for 350 miles of recreation and commuting paths in all five boroughs. In 2002 Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg pledged to have the Manhattan loop built, and the city began stitching together existing pedestrian walkways, esplanades and city streets into a single route — in some areas paving connections and in others simply planting signs pointing the way.

Hanging a left so that I’d be circling Manhattan counterclockwise, I quickly reached a new segment. Cantilevered over the water, the path between West 90th and West 83rd Streets has a jaunty boardwalk feel. Before it was built, cyclists had to veer inland up a steep hill and reconnect near 79th Street. Now the path continues uninterrupted for more than 10 glorious miles close to the river, from the George Washington Bridge to the Battery.

Although I’d timed my departure to avoid the crowds later in the day, already cyclists — along with joggers, in-line skaters and stroller pushers — were out in force. At a cafe around West 70th Street, servers were opening table umbrellas for the day.

Here in Riverside Park South, the bike lane runs under the elevated West Side Highway. Still, cyclists have a good view of the rusted remains of the 69th Street Transfer Bridge, one of the relics from the city’s industrial past that you can see as you pedal. Out on the water a blue-and-white tugboat pushed a barge.

But keep your eyes on the path: Travelers streaming off a cruise ship rolled suitcases across the route at West 48th Street. Ten blocks later, a parked white bike, with back baskets overflowing with dried flowers, was a sobering memorial to a cyclist who was killed by a truck there in 2006.

Approaching Battery Park City after being separated from the water by basketball and tennis courts, I made a few turns near Stuyvesant High School and continued south, again right along the water. Hello, Statue of Liberty!

EAST SIDE When you get to Battery Park, the trick is figuring out which way the Greenway goes — now you see the signs for it, now you don’t. But once I was on the path bordering the East River, there were fewer cyclists than on the West Side, and no wonder. Although it’s thrilling to pass under the Brooklyn, Manhattan and Williamsburg Bridges, the Greenway here is a disjointed affair.

At East 35th Street the path heads inland, skirting the United Nations on busy First Avenue. Several blocks later I got caught up in the flow of traffic and found myself on that F. D. R. Drive ramp. My mistake was not spotting the pedestrian bridge over the highway, leading back to the Greenway.

The map says it’s a clear shot to the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge, at 125th Street. But repairs on the path in the East 70s meant that I had to tack back and forth across the F. D. R. Drive on pedestrian bridges. And for now the Greenway turns at 120th Street, so once again it is back onto city thoroughfares.

HARLEM AND THE HARLEM RIVER The Greenway continues west in Harlem — some blocks are lined with lovely old brownstones — then north on St. Nicholas Avenue. I crossed West 125th Street as noon church bells rang.

There’s no waterfront along this part of the Waterfront Greenway, but there’s plenty of greenery along St. Nicholas Park. Still, when I finally reached the Harlem River, after riding along Edgecombe Avenue and crossing over Harlem River Drive, it felt good to be back by the water again.

The view along this least-traveled part of the path isn’t fetching: high-rises and highway on the Bronx side. But fishermen with propped-up rods give this area a homey feel, while rowing crews gliding by add a sporty vibe. And because there’s practically no one else around, you can finally cut loose.

In fact, this area was called the Harlem River Speedway at the beginning of the 20th century, a straightaway for horse and carriage racing. Today cherry and crabapple trees beautify the West 180s. The yellow and green Peter Jay Sharp Boathouse occupies a pier at the tiny Swindler Cove Park (at Dyckman Street and 10th Avenue, in Inwood), with its winding paths and tidy rows of potatoes, lettuce and fava beans tended by students at the school next door.

DYCKMAN STREET CONNECTION This nerve-racking stretch of storefronts and double-parked cars connects the Greenway on the East Side with the trail along the Hudson. Eudes Espino, co-manager of Tread Bike Shop on Dyckman Street, said that at least once a day a cyclist wandered in to ask how to get back onto the Greenway. By the end of the year, work will have begun on a ramp to the Hudson River part of the path, according to the Parks Department. For now, head up Riverside Drive, then lug your bike up stairs to reach the path along the Henry Hudson Parkway.

GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE AREA To your right, the Hudson River is a silvery ribbon far below, glinting through the trees. At Inspiration Point, a 1925 overlook modeled on a Greek temple, cyclists stop and gaze at the George Washington Bridge. Soon you’re swooping down to the foot of the bridge, with the Little Red Lighthouse tucked at its feet. From here to Riverbank State Park, the Greenway runs through what feels like a big block party on weekends. Volleyball nets are unfurled. Barbecues sizzle. The scene is more pastoral along Cherry Walk, from West 125th to West 100th streets, where the path weaves between trees that were beautifully in bloom for me.

Nearing West 100th Street, a cyclist in front of me swerved to avoid broken glass. I did too. But several yards later, at the exact spot where I’d started my journey four and a half hours earlier, Dr. Edward Fishkin sat on a patch of grass next to his red Cannondale bike, expertly fixing a flat.

The medical director of Woodhull Medical and Mental Health Center and a cyclist for 25 years, Dr. Fishkin bikes up to 250 miles a week, and the occasional flat just comes with the territory. He rarely experiences flats on the Greenway, however, Dr. Fishkin said, adding, “Compared to what riding was like in the city 20 years ago, this is phenomenal.”

Pleasanton uses microwave technology to protect cyclists

 

By Robert Jordan, Contra Costa Times

PLEASANTON — When it comes to protecting its pedal-pwered residents with technology, Pleasanton has outpaced even its more recognized bicycle-friendly counterparts, Berkeley and Davis.

Pleasanton is the only city in the nation using a new radar-type device to make street crossings safer for bikers.  The city began testing the “Intersector” — a microwave motion and presence sensor — for that use in January 2010 at one of its 104 signales intersections.  The device monitors the intersection and can differentiate between vehicles and bicyclists crossing the road and either extends or triggers the light if a cyclist is detected.

“I would like to think we are bicycle-friendly,” said Joshua Pack, Pleasanton’s senior transportation engineer.  “We are not actively yelling and screaming that we are doing it, but behind the scenes we are.”

The results fro the test run, at Foothill Road and Stoneridge Drive, went so well that the city installed the device at six other intersections and has plans to add four more.

Since it began using the Intersector, the city has received calls from at least 20 other jurisdictions, from some in the Bay Area to as far away as Memphis, Tenn., that want to know how the experiment is going.

“It’s nice to feel acknowledged and recognized,” said Jim Ott, a Pleasanton resident and cyclist.  “Before (the light) didn’t give as much time, so you had to cycle harder to make it.  You also didn’t want to get caught in the middle.  And, if the light didn’t trigger, you were a sitting duck for folks to bump into.”

State Sen. Jean Fuller, R-Bakersfield, authored AB1581 three years ago.  It called for improved safety and compliance rules for cyclists at traffic lights, requiring new traffic signals or replacing existing ones with devices able to detect motorcyclists and bicyclists.

Cyclists in Pleasanton said the new technology makes it safer because they are not tempted to run red lights or forced to cross traffic lanes to push the crosswalk button.

Before purchasing the Intersectors — produced by MS Sedco and costing between $4,000 to $5,000 each — Pleasanton used video detection and sensors embedded in the street to try to detect cyclists.  The city still used those methods at all intersections, with the Intersector complementing what is already in place.

Video detection has its drawbacks, with fog and wind affecting its performance and success rate.  And the street0embedded sensors can be problematic if cyclists are not directly on the sensors or if their bikes are not made of metal.

It is possible for cyclists to coexist with traffic,” said Ursula Goldstein, a cyclist and Pleasanton resident since 1982.  “We need to get into the mindset that bicycles are vehicles, and they obey the rules of the road.”

In an effort to become more bike-friendly, Pleasanton has narrowed streets to add bike lanes, adopted a bicycle and pedestrian master plan and is up for Bicycle Friendly Community recognition by the League of American Bicyclists.  Oakland was the only city to ear the honor last year, according to the League of American Bicyclist website.

“Pleasanton is doing some great things,” said Renee Rivera, executive director of the East Bay Bicycle Coalition.  “It is getting more bike-friendly all the time.”

Cyclist Culture: Pedaling Attitude

“Bicycle culture” with BikeSnobNYC, a Portland biking maven, and Bicycling Magazine.

Here’s the link.  Listen to the discussion aired yesterday on On Point from WBUR in Boston.

http://onpoint.wbur.org/2010/05/06/cyclist-culture

The comments following the article are interesting reading in themselves.  Then click the links to the guests’ sites for some apres-interview reactions.

America is car country, but bicycles and bicyclists are making their play for the roads.

There’s been a big surge in bicycle commuting. Maybe it’s you or your workmate rolling freshly-exercised into the office.

And then there’s the weekend distance rider and the off-to-the-market rider.

All the tribes: the roadie, the mountain biker, the messenger. And all the attitudes: the righteous cyclist, the lone wolf, the captains of contraption.

We’re talking this hour with New York’s famous “Bike Snob” blogger and a biking maven from Portland, Oregon.

Guests:

Loren Mooney is editor-in-chief of Bicycling Magazine. Their May issue ranks America’s Top 50 Bike-Friendly Cities.

Eben Weiss blogs at BikeSnobNYC.blogspot.com. He’s a racer, daily commuter, and former bike messenger. His new book is “Bike Snob: Systematically & Mercilessly Realigning the World of Cycling.”

Heidi Swift is a freelance writer. She writes the “Everyday Cyclist” column for The Oregonian. She blogs atGritandGlimmer.com.

 

 

Bike and Roll NYC Featured in Frugalnomics

For a fresh new perspective on New York City that won’t break your piggy bank, check out Bike and Roll New York City’s bike rentals on Governor’s Island. As featured in Frugalnomics, Bike and Roll NYC’s Free Fridays program provides NYC residents and tourists a great way to see the city, get some exercise, and feel the ocean breezes without spending a lot of that precious commodity, your hard earned dollars.

On Free Friday, you can rent a bike from Bike and Roll NYC’s Governor’s Island location for one hour at no charge. Keep the bike for an hour longer for just $15; for half a day, it’s just $20; and, if you arrive early enough in the morning, you can rent a bike for the whole day for just $25.

A Walk on the Lonely Side

By JAMES BARRON

“It’s a nice little slog to get up there,” Richard Melnick said. “Just like why people climb mountains.”

With that, he went up the concrete stairs, leading the way to something most New Yorkers think of as a horizontal landmark, not a vertical one: the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge. Of course, that was not the name on his lips — aficionados like Mr. Melnick still call it the Triborough Bridge. More about that later.

Yes, you can walk the R.F.K., one of the legacies of Robert Moses, who gave New York a labyrinth of bridges and parkways. Monday was the 75th anniversary of the day the first car paid the first toll, collected after a ceremony that was attended by President Franklin D. Roosevelt and a motorcade that featured 14 cars and 35 police motorcycles.

Some accounts said that the first ordinary person who actually made it to the tollbooths was a boy on a bicycle. Nowadays, signs are posted saying bike riders are prohibited, and advising: “Walk bicycles across bridge.”

made his way across. All were pedaling, or braking, hard. The Queens stretch of the bridge that he covered on foot includes a quarter-mile or so that he said was “one of the toughest inclines anywhere.”

Mr. Melnick is, among other things, a licensed tour guide. He is also on the board of the Greater Astoria Historical Society and he was trailed by organization’s executive director, Robert S. Singleton (“ ‘Bob’ on this side of the East River,” he said). Mr. Singleton was busy over the weekend helping to open a photography exhibit at the society’s Quinn Gallery on Broadway in Long Island City — he said he had walked the Triborough only once before, in the 1980s.

Mr. Melnick said he had walked the bridge “maybe 50 or 60 times, and I’m still enthralled by it; the view is that great.”

Others have been similarly mesmerized over the years — the architect Lewis Mumford said the bridge had “one of the most dazzling urban views in the world.” But somehow the Triborough never acquired a personality. New Yorkers are charmed by the Brooklyn Bridge or intrigued by the Verrazano-Narrows. But for generations, the Triborough has been little more than the first leg in a getaway, to the airport or to Long Island.

“I had friends come in from Wisconsin,” Mr. Melnick said. “They wanted to walk across the Brooklyn Bridge. I said, ‘That’s too touristy.’ ”

Walking across the R.F.K. is not as easy as walking across those other bridges. “It just doesn’t lend itself to walking,” Mr. Singleton said. Walking from Queens to, say, Manhattan means leaving one bridge where the walkway ends on Wards Island and finding the way to another walkway — and another span — leading to Manhattan.

Mr. Melnick said that means the R.F.K. is less than popular with walkers and pedal-pushers. “I ride my bicycle to and from work — I’m a night doorman in the city,” he said. “I passed 88 people on the Queensboro Bridge” one morning last week. “Friday morning, I went from Manhattan to Randalls Island. Then I took the main span to Astoria. I saw one person the whole time.”

The walkway puts pedestrians close to traffic and, Mr. Melnick said, danger. There is a shoulder-high barrier, a concrete wall. “Once, when I was a better runner, I was up here and I heard ‘tink, tink, tink,’ ” he said. “There was a bouncing hubcap rolling along the wall to my left. It was going 60 miles an hour.”

Monday’s walk took a little less than two hours. Forty-seven minutes into it, somewhere between the two giant towers of the suspension span from Queens, the matter of the name came up. In 2008, Gov. David A. Paterson renamed what had been the Triborough Bridge in honor of Robert F. Kennedy, who was a United States Senator from New York from 1965 until his assassination in 1968.

Mr. Melnick was diplomatic. “We’re not all in agreement with the renaming,” he said.

Then he described a brush with greatness. It happened a few months after the Triborough became the R.F.K., when he went to a Jets-49ers game on the West Coast.

In the airport in California, he saw Robert F. Kennedy Jr. and introduced himself.

“I did not have the guts to object,” he said. “I chickened out. He could have yelled out ‘Security,’ and I’m tackled in an airport and my personal friends would have seen me arrested.”

“But I do have it on my personal list: I shook his hand.”

The City and Bike: Rubber Meets Road

by Jason Gay, Wall Street Journal, June 22, 2011
It is now summer 2011 and have you noticed a change? New York City isn’t freaking out so hard about bicycling.

Spring was a little shrill and embarrassing. There were crazed media furies about bike lanes, non-stop reports of police crackdowns, hyperbolic worries that the city was transforming into an effete Euro village. If we didn’t defend our streets, the cyclists would overtake Manhattan. Mayor Bloomberg and Department of Transportation commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan would open a leg-shaving station in Union Square.

One day you’d walk down to the harbor and see the Statue of Liberty sausaged into tight shorts, sipping a Stumptown espresso and thumbing through Velonews.
But then a funny thing occurred. It got warmer, more people started riding, and the mania was eclipsed by reality.

That’s the beauty of a bike, a simple machine with two wheels and zero ideology. When you can turn a pedal and feel safe, it’s fun and makes sense.

And anyone can ride. There have been cheesy distortions of cycling as a trendy, elite activity—to link bike paths to ongoing gentrification, and claim the city is catering to a hipster fringe.
You want to see what a fraud that argument is? Get on a bike and ride. For every Spandexed obsessive tucked on a $3,000 carbon fiber frame you’ll see 100 people of every imaginable background just trying to get to work, do their job, have fun with their kids, safely spin from A to B.

Bikes are New York fringe? Email your friends. Ask how many of them own bikes. Then ask how many of them own cars. If more of them say they own cars, look out the window. You live in Connecticut.
This is not to say there aren’t problems. Safety is still a priority. Many places in the city continue to need pathways and better solutions. A ride through midtown still feels like Car-mageddon. The West Side Bike path on a weekend is a free-for-all. The Brooklyn Bridge is tourist madness—always take the saner Manhattan, if you can.

And cyclists can’t be exempt from criticism. A bike rider in New York City has a responsibility to be not just an advocate but an ambassador. There’s nothing worse than a haughty biker who thinks the rules don’t apply to him or her.

Actually there is something worse: a haughty biker without a helmet blowing a whistle, yelling out of the corner of his or her mouth for people to get out of the way. Slow down, lunatic.
But New York’s cycling momentum looks unstoppable. The city is finally closing in on a bike sharing program, in which people will be able to rent bikes for a small fee at a kiosk and return it at another kiosk at their destination. This is long overdue. It’s a little embarrassing New York doesn’t already have it. Washington, D.C. beat us.

Think bike sharing has nothing for you? You know the traffic nightmare of getting across town at 4:30 p.m.? Can’t get a cab; subway doesn’t go there; it’s too far to walk. Imagine paying a couple bucks to hop on a bike, and pedal safely through the gridlock to get there in five minutes.

Naturally, there are cries that bike sharing will cause chaos, that ghastly kiosks will clutter the sidewalks, that it’s another example of urban planning gone amok.

Right, of course! Paris installed bike sharing a few years ago, and now look at it. It’s completely ruined; nobody goes to Paris anymore.

The revival of urban cycling in this country follows a fairly predictable pattern: nervousness and ridicule, followed by the realization that the truth never matches the fear-mongering. The supposed choice between bikes and everyone else is a bogus choice. More bikes in a city doesn’t merely benefit riders; it reduces congestion, saves money, improves quality of life, elevates the experience. No one returns from a city and says, “Oh, it was great—except for all the biking.”

The biggest mischaracterization about the infamous New York Cycling War is that there’s a war at all.
Look all around you. The bikes have won, and it’s not a terrible thing.